Our Wild    Life

Nature photography by John Langley ARPS & Tracy Langley ARPS

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Diary 2019


March


We spent several days on a farm this month, trying to photograph hares. Unfortunately it was just after storm Gareth with high winds and heavy rain. The hares seemed to have taken cover in the woods and the long grass so we only managed to photograph them on one afternoon. However, a pair of kestrels kept us entertained each morning.


We soon learnt to tell the two kestrels apart - the female has an all brown head

and a narrow black band towards the end of her striped tail.












The male has a grey head and a wider black band on his plain tail.










Whilst we were in the hide one morning a red-legged partridge wandered by :




The farm also has a healthy population of tree sparrows :






Hares were the main focus of our visit, but they were being rather shy.

Each afternoon & evening we split up - one in a pop-up hide, one in a bag hide.

Most times nothing came by but one sunny afternoon we each had a couple of nice hare encounters :
















A bonus that we hadn’t expected was a barn owl that decided it was hungry earlier than usual one evening :










February


Wildlife photography doesn’t always turn out as planned. When we booked a fortnight in the Scottish Highlands at the end of February we were hoping for snow. However, a heat-wave struck and there were record temperatures approaching 20’C. What little snow had fell on the hill-tops during the winter rapidly melted away, leaving only tiny pockets here and there. However, there was a silver-lining to this weather cloud ! We did lots of hill walking and bagged a couple of Munros so returned home much fitter. The calm conditions meant that we could get up many of the mountains that are often too dangerous to climb in the fierce winter winds that we usually encounter at this time of year. Thus we spent many days photographing one of our favourite birds - the ptarmigan.



Easier to spot than usual, standing out in their white winter plumage.






Many of the birds were already paired up. This was earlier than usual, possibly due to the mild temperatures.




Some territorial fights broke out when males invaded territories.




We got some funny looks from a male that flew close to us whilst we were eating our sandwiches. He then went on to claim his territory (still eyeing up our lunch !)












The birds seemed to be enjoying the mild weather as much as us, resting in the sunshine.










Some birds managed to find a little patch of snow to cool down on.








A few of the males were flying around in response to calls from other birds.








A very confiding individual allowed us close enough to see it’s feathered eye-lid.





We found a few mountain hares lazing in the sunshine.









We spent a morning in Neil McIntyre’s red squirrel hide where a couple of squirrels entertained us.














January


We love foxes but usually they’re shy and difficult to photograph. Last year we found a group that were less wary of people and this January we paid them a repeat visit. We learnt a little more about fox behaviour, finding that January isn’t really a good time to see foxes as they’re pre-occupied with mating. However, we did find the foxes on several days during our week and despite gales, rain and hail they were excellent company.
































































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